Say You Want a Revolution

BookTalk 4.1 – Say You Want a Revolution

Invisible Man – Prologue and Chapter 1
The Invisibles – Issues #1-8

Music can connect, engage, and enrich. A fuller picture is painted. Tapping into an untold story, revealing a long forgotten history. Music can be transformative. A record when records don’t exist, for the story has been told via word of mouth and forgotten between the ears.

“…I might as well take part in the battle royal to be fought by some of my schoolmates as part of the entertainment. The battle royal came first.” Nature exudes a brutal violence that people choose to indulge, falling victim to an intoxicating illness. Rage can be transformative. Graphic violence can spread like a viral emotion, whether cathartic or oppressive.

In the beginning of The Invisibles, the first story is titled “Dead Beatle$” and the mixed media allusions pour out from the start. Grant Morrison captures the angst of youthful rebellion and dials in on counterculture, narrowing in on John Lennon and the power of psychedelic time travel.

Scan_dead beatle2.jpeg

“Down and Out” (in Heaven and Hell) happens to be the title for the subsequent three episodes in The Invisibles, and it also refers to George Orwell’s social experiment of living in poverty. The homeless and the utterly destitute to the hoboes and drifters choosing to live like modern nomadic transients, take the narrative focus and frame the streets with compassion and awe.

Who is invisible? Through the first 8 issues of The Invisibles a collection of characters grow an answer list: the Invisibles as young adulthood; ghosts; covert spies and secret agents; conspirators; the poor; rats and pigeons; the elderly and ill; transgender; the criminal; storytellers, artists, and mass media; wards of the insane asylum; heroes and legends; African Americans; free thinkers.

 

The narrator concludes that “Even an invisible man has a socially responsible role to play.” This is an important tenet of Ellison’s philosophy, for he believed that art should serve democracy. In what way is Invisible Man a novel that deals specifically with the problems and challenges of democracy?

Leave a Reply