Three Wishes

1)  F-Zero / Wizorb cross over video game
F-Zorb would be a racing game like F-Zero with a built in puzzle-battle mode.  When vehicles approach they can toggle a lock-on function that activates a dual screen top-down effect.  The vehicles are automatically rendered as retro 2-D block collections that then battle in Wizorb fashion.  Picture a block breaker, pong style back and forth between opponents, while battle racing to the finish.

2)  Narcos Netflix series, seasons 4-6, to focus on the rise of El Chapo
Finish the Colombian Cali Cartel storyline in season 3 and start the transition to Mexican Narcos, using Roberto Bolaño’s source material.

3)  A New Judge Dredd movie on “The Robot Wars
Call-Me-Kenneth is the perfect villain for a proper Judge Dredd reboot.  This time around the tone needs to be more like a Robert Rodriguez “grindhouse” film with emphasis on cyborgs and the rise of the Neon Knights.

#301984

Find a new tweet each day in the month of April @BeardofSteel on Twitter.  30 quotes from the first chapter of 1984 rationed for victory and assembled by the hashtag 301984.  30 years after 1984, in the year 2014, I also pieced together a literary analysis of 1Q84, V for Vendetta and 1984, that explores their lasting appeal.  #301984 attempts to clarify all of the sudden resurgence in popularity of a novel published 70 years ago.  Enjoy!

A Climactic Ending

Through the month of March, I managed to write 3 short essays on the major changes in Motion Pictures during the last decade of the twentieth century; it takes less than 10 minutes to read.  First, the over saturation of satire set the stage for post-truth realities in the 21st century.  Second, Web 2.0 brought life to a Truman Show way of life for all, the blueprint for our contemporary echo chambers and the death knell to the theater experience — as it stands now the majority of moviegoers in 2017 are over age 50.  Third, the extension of viewing times exceeded the matinee marathon and binge-watching bloated audience appetite for all-you-can-eat storytelling.  Read all about it on Medium:

You Should (Re)Watch 1990’s Bonfire of the Vanities

YouTube Killed the Movie Star: From Laces Out to Get Out

The Fat Lady Sings: this Completes the Trilogy, Not the Saga

 

Super Fly Films

Like a lit stick of Dolemite thrown down a mine Shaft full of TNT, blaxploitation cinema’s explosive content blew open a spectrum of lenses to film America.  Super Fly is a 1972 crime drama directed by Gordon Parks, Jr., starring Ron O’Neal as Youngblood Priest, an African American cocaine dealer who is trying to quit the underworld drug business.  This film is probably best known for its soundtrack, written and produced by soul musician Curtis Mayfield. Super Fly is one of the few films ever to have been out-grossed by its soundtrack.